Tin Hau Temple in Lam Tsuen, Hong Kong

Praying at the temple is one of the most important traditions during the Lunar New Year, together with the family reunion dinner, red envelopes, new year decorations and etc. Typically worshippers go to the temple on the third day of the new year. You will find that most temples are normally getting full during the first week of the new year.

On my trip to Hong Kong, I visited a Tin Hau Temple in Lam Tsuen, after making a wish on the wishing tree there. The Tin Hau temple next to the plastic wishing trees has a long history. It was built in Qing dynasty. Where the temple is now located used to be the site of the original wishing tree.

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Central-Mid-Levels Escalators in Hong Kong: the world’s longest outdoor escalator system

In most parts of the world, if you have to commute from one side to another in a big city, your daily commute route would probably consist of some congested streets, packed busses or trains, or long bike rides. In this regard, commuters between Central and Mid-levels in Hong Kong Island are much luckier, as their way to and off work is simply standing in place and enjoying a 20 minutes escalator trip. Meanwhile they can check their phones or look around, appreciating the view of the streets of Hong Kong island.

The escalator system in Central HK is 790 m long, the world’s longest outdoor covered escalator system.

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The working class Hong Kong: Sham Shui Po district

Located in the northwestern part of the Kowloon Peninsula, crowded with working class population, Sham Shui Po is the most down-to-earth area of Hong Kong, in my opinion. It used to be an industrial centre of Hong Kong and now there are massive markets full of electronics products, computer gadgets, accessories, street food, etc. In a city as expensive as Hong Kong, Sham Shui Po attracts a large crowd, both locals and foreigners.

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「The Weight of Lightness」 Ink Art exhibition at M+ Pavilion in Hong Kong

For thousands of years, ink art has been recognized as a strong identity in East Asian culture. We use ink to paint symbols, scripts, strokes; and to express our feelings. The watery and misty atmosphere that an ink water painting creates has also influenced how we define a beautiful landscape. At least I always think many scenic sites in China look much better on a cloudy and rainy day than a sunny day, for example, Zhangjiajie or the West Lake in Hangzhou, you name it.

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